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The Limits of Omnipotence

February 20, 2018 Leave a comment

So my country has had another mass shooting, and I thought it would be relatively easy to speak on that for today’s post, but then I wondered what was the new thing that I could say. Basically, I could just repeat what I’ve said before and just switch out the places. Instead of X I could say “school” or in the case of the Connecticut shooting I could keep the place and just change the age of the victim (my country has a lot of these kinds of shootings). However some politicians and commentators offered  me a new take on it. I was going to come up with the examples but enough people have made the comment that the list is too long and I don’t want to be accused of cherry picking so let’s just say Todd Starnes said it (because he did) and then a whole bunch of other people agreed with him that school shootings are the result of kicking god out of the schools.

Ignoring the fact that “god” wasn’t kicked out of the schools–forced prayer was–let’s examine this claim in detail.

If there is a law which tells me I can’t do X, that doesn’t mean that I cannot do X what it means is that if I do X I can suffer consequences for that action. A law which mandates that I stand for the pledge of allegiance doesn’t force my action by virtue of the law itself, it forces the action by causing me to weight the consequences of the action. If I deem the penalty as too severe I will stand for the poem, if deem it not severe enough than I can choose to sit and possibly suffer the consequence. The same goes for any law or rule. The compulsion is only from consequence avoidance. As Alexander Solzhenitsyn once commented that freedom of speech existed in the USSR as well as the USA, the only difference was that in the USA we had freedom after speech. The difference is important especially when we consider what people like Todd Starnes are saying.

Their belief is that the US passed a law by which “god” was no longer allowed in schools. Now, I doubt that they are so devoid of rational thinking that they believe the literal being was denied access to the school…maybe…but that it was illegal to pray, bring a bible, or anything religious based. So a student “John” cannot pray. This has caused a blanket ban on all religious thought, consideration, or feeling in the school. As a result the omnipotent being that John would have prayed to can no longer find His (because we know what god people like Starnes are talking about and it ain’t anyone other than Jesus) way into the school, or even on school property. As a result, this means that the school shooter gets to unload a few clips of his AR-15 style rifle into some students. QED making prayer forbidden in school caused this.

The implication here is that god is bound by US secular law. Once the law is enacted and the court passes its ruling it’s like Gandalf on the bridge of Khazad-Dum forbidding the supernatural being from passing. What Starnes and his ilk seem to believe, again because it bears repeating, that god is bound by US secular law. That’s the first possibility. The second is the one they actually aren’t saying aloud and is pure speculation on my part, that, they believe god is causing the mass shootings because we don’t allow enough Jesus inside the school. The second, of course, is not something that most religious people believe and should, indeed, find quite offensive. The problem of evil trilemma is almost never solved by eliminating the Omni-benevolence portion in this manner.*

That returns us to the first possibility which severely limits the power of god to even speeding. This would explain a lot of the absence, but it also means that every person living within the US legal boundary has more power than the divine being that Starnes wants back in the schools. Especially those that are not legally citizens, since their mere presence is more powerful than the creator of the universe. This is not a god worth worshipping since its power is so limited, in fact it’s not a god at all.

 

*Though sometimes it’s eliminated by way of “god works in mysterious ways.” Which implies that even the worst tragedies are to some greater plan that involves such intense human suffering and our feeble minds will never grasp the true meaning. It’s not a satisfying answer by any respect but if you hear it enough times as a child you learn to stop asking why (at least that was my experience).

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Pope Francis Update

January 22, 2018 4 comments

It’s been a bit since I’ve checked in with our favorite dude in the pointy white hat. Since no one will pay for an assistant who will go find all of my previous Pope check ins, I’ll say this much in summary: as an Atheist I’ve been told I’m supposed to like this guy. He’s publicly commented that I’m not necessarily going to hell because I’m an atheist (Catholics are typically deeds not words Christians), that the science of Evolution and the Big Bang explain life and how everything came about (which were publicly explained as not opposed to Catholic doctrine by previous Popes), and his commented about how the vast inequality in the world is the root of all social evil. However, and again, I’ve said this repeatedly: it’s always one step forward two steps back with this guy.

You can’t start talking about how god isn’t some magical wizard that creates everything and then publicly call for the ordination of new exorcists so that we can fight the demons. The two things do not really work together. So now we have the Pope wrap up for the last several months.

First story and the one that gained the most attention: his comments in South America about the accusations against Bishop Juan Barros, that it “was all calumny.” The facts are this: Barros is accused not of sexual assault but of covering up accusations of assault and improper conduct against Fernando Kardima a priest in Santiago, Chile. Kardima’s case is the same old story of all the cases, initial accusations were brought up in the 80s only to be discarded until 2004 when the Vatican opened up its own investigation…which was then suspended for three years because of a statute of limitations concern with regard to Chilean law. Finally, a proper investigation was opened by the Chilean government in 2010 and the Catholic Church removed him from his position forbidding him from performing in public and any kind of spiritual advising. Notice that there judgment does not include defrocking or removal of his title or status within the church. The accusers of Kardima claim that Barros was not only aware of the accusations but that he was direct witness to them. I cannot speak to the truth of falsity of the claims but given the “punishment” of Kardima, the history of cover ups within the church, it would stand at the very least as a public relations move to not accuse Kardima’s victims of slander against Barros. Even within Chile, a heavily Catholic country, there is a large resistance to the Vatican’s appointment of Barros as Bishop and a general reluctance to send children to Catholic school because of the known and systemic problems in the Vatican of dealing with these issues. Yet the Pope has offered an “apology.” The typical, “I’m sorry if you were hurt by my words but…” type of apology in which the first part of the statement is negated by the second part.

The second piece of news, from December, was largely uncovered by the news media for reasons that I’m not aware of. Boston Archbishop Bernard Law died at the age of 86 and was given a full Cardinal’s funeral in the Vatican presided over by Pope Francis. Law, if you don’t remember, was the villain in 2014’s Oscar winning Spotlight which told the story of the investigation into the sex abuse cover up in Boston which broke in 2001. Law, whose name I’m just realizing is ironic, is not directly responsible for any sexual abuse of children in that he isn’t accused of actually doing it. What he’s accused of his allowing and abetting it to continue by shielding the accused from the law and merely playing a large game of three card monte with those who have perpetrated the child rape. Law resigned his position in 2002 and then went on to live at the Vatican as an arch priest at the St. Mary Major Papal basilica in Rome. He got a nice retirement package and then a full honors funeral all presided over by the current Pope.

Is it hypocrisy, or just lies that we are dealing with because I can’t decide? On the one hand the Pope has set up a council to deal with sexual abuse amongst the church but on the other hand, these continued actions along with allowing Cardinal Pell of Australia to hide out in Rome as Vatican treasurer for a number of years (they’ve since sent him back). Still on the other hand that council has effectively been abolished since the “term limits” on the appointments had expired. The Vatican is really good about keeping track of legal time limits.

Once again, this Pope is all talk and no action. Sure, some of the things that he says sound really good–an expanded role for women in the Church, progress on social issues that aren’t abortion, and a reformed manner of conduct with regard to sex abuse; but when it comes down to action I’m wondering when we’ll see any.

This is just another brick in my foundation for refusing to like this guy. He’s like a bar friend, sure I’ll listen to him talk for a bit but I’ll never make a specific plan to see him. By now, the atheist infatuation with this new hope has long passed, but the mystery to me was why it ever existed in the first place.

Bad Influence

January 15, 2018 1 comment

Atheists are a bad influence, obviously. That’s why in some countries atheist bloggers are hacked to death by machetes, imprisoned and whipped, and in the US 13 states won’t allow them to hold public office. It’s why we’re the least trusted “religious” group in the US. Yet, sometimes the atheist argument lines up perfectly with a non-atheist argument as I was trying to make clear last week at a family function.

My position was that my cousin shouldn’t have to go to religious education classes for the Catholic Sacrament of Confirmation. Now, wait up. I wasn’t making the “I don’t think anyone should have to go to religious education class” argument–even though I think that is a perfectly rational argument to make. I was making a different argument based on personal experience. Long time readers will know that I went through all of the Catholic sacraments (except Holy Orders and Last Rites–of which the second should be obvious), with Confirmation being that last one.

My cousin is in the “Confirmation prep” stage where he’s having to go to these religious education classes in order to prepare for the sacrament. For those ignorant of it, it’s just Baptism II only this time you are supposed to be aware and making a free choice, provided you don’t count familial and social pressure when you call it “free.” You get up, say a bunch of words affirming your belief in Jesus, the Pope, denying Satan, and pledging loyalty to the church. The Bishop blesses the whole thing and then you get cake. I’m being glib but that’s the nuts and bolts of the sacrament.

So, other than the atheist objection, what could possibly be my problem? The classes are pointless for my cousin just as they were pointless for me because we both attend(ed) Catholic school. Catholic school has religious education classes as part of the daily curriculum and its assumed that all the students are Catholics. This latter part, is of course not true, some people just sent their kids to Catholic school because it can be a better education. Nonetheless the religious education courses in the school take care of the instruction on what Catholics believe, how they are supposed to act with regard to their religion and the various historical facts concerning both the religion and the church. This makes the Sunday night course (that’ swhen my class was) absolutely superfluous for someone who is attending such a school.

For me, the classes were enjoyable for one reason: there were women there. I resented having to go to school on a sixth day for stuff that I already knew because I had learned it in the three years of Catholic high school and the nine years of Catholic grade school (I’m a survivor). Whereas the other students in the room, the ones who had attended the one hour post church classes for their lives, and some that hadn’t; could spout off some the Commandments and maybe knew who the current Pope was, were probably getting taught something. Part of the whole deal of Catholic school was to provide the extra religious instruction so forcing people to go to the other classes also seemed like a waste of the other student’s time as well. The teachers of the course just expected us to know the answers to the questions, but we were usually completely zoned out for the reasons mentioned above.

The further redundancy was the mandatory community “volunteer” project where they forced us to “volunteer” doing something in order to claim that we were ready to fulfill the sacrament. My high school mandated the same thing in order to progress a grade. I forget what the hours were but let’s say it was twenty. The Confirmation class also mandated an amount, let’s again say it was twenty.* Alright, cool, two birds one rolling stone? No. They didn’t overlap, or at least it wasn’t assumed by either organization that it would. The more creative of us (never doubt the ingenuity of a lazy person to work a loophole) were able to connive some sort of overlap, but nevertheless the entire point was rendered meaningless by the forcing of it.

You can’t make a person volunteer for something. That’s a contradiction, a point which upon bringing it up got me sent to the disciplinarians office in high school. I was told that it really was volunteering because I wanted to do it, to which I replied, “No, I want to move up a grade, this is a requirement.” He responded that meant I wanted to, and that I should. Which, earning a detention, I said “No, I will do it but I won’t call it volunteering because it’s not of my own choice (I wasn’t reading Kant on my own, they taught us about free will and choice in religion class).” The point is that the extra religion class was redundant in every respect except that it was a few years behind my other Catholic school cohort’s pace.

So upon making this argument at the family function, I was called a “bad influence.” Here’s the thing, all of those arguments before weren’t originally developed by me,  I was told them when I was going through it by family members and friend’s parents who didn’t think they needed to drive me to school on Sunday night to learn something I was getting taught on Monday. Further, certain people at the function agreed with me. However I’m the bad influence because I’m the only one that would take the argument one step further and say it’s not needed at all.

Now, I’m not trying to air some private family issues (that’s why I’m not using any names), all I’m saying is that the argument makes sense. If there was something, anything, that justified the redundant classes other than “that’s what they say you have to do” I would just have chalked it up to being another hoop that the Catholic Church makes you jump through. However no one was able at the time to give me such a reasoning.

 

  • I can’t remember what the exact hours were but they were the same amount.

Cartoons and the Like

January 9, 2018 Leave a comment

Well, it’s been a long two weeks of me not realizing that my blog day was on holidays. Part of me wanted to do a year in review of atheism news and such but then the week passed and I just lost interest in doing so. Basically my year in review would have been a run down of stories where American Evangelicals will overlook literally everything as long as the person who is accused of it/convicted of it is one of their people. My atheist person of the year would have been, “The Roy Moore Supporter” for the same reason.

In my day job I’m an adjunct Philosophy professor and during the break I decided that I wanted to change up the political philosophy section of my course concentrating on something that might get some class discussion going. Typically my course revolves around covering subjects and then some disagreements among philosophers on those subjects. In the Philosophy of religion sections I do two proofs of god’s existence and then I do two counter explanations for religion (because you can’t prove a negative). Then I sit back and wait for the class to discuss…which they don’t, so then I have to try and pry a conversation out of them. In addition to a reworking of my Epicurean/Stoicism conversation (in which I just decided to concentrate on whether or not we have free will) I moved the entire conversation to be about free speech.

This required that I come up with examples of when free speech gets “iffy.” The “yeah…but” of the First Amendment. I’ve got a bunch of things, from pornography to flag burning, all based around the central argument of Mill’s “On Liberty” in which he states that the only restriction permissible is that of bodily harm. So in addition to those examples I came to the religious examples. Because, this country doesn’t have blasphemy laws but others do.

In my example list I covered “The Satanic Verses” a book that famously earned Salman Rushdie a death sentence from Iran. A book, that I couldn’t get through, because I thought it was bad but that I only read because of the issue. I discuss the controversy over “Piss Christ” which again, I only was ever aware of because of that specific controversy. That lead me to the Danish Cartoons and the Charlie Hebdo massacre, of which the anniversary was yesterday. The position of the lecture is that Free Speech is an absolute right, following Mill that can only be restricted by a clear case of bodily harm.

The Danish Cartoons were interesting because they didn’t result in the kind of massacre that Charlie Hebdo’s publication did. What’s more interesting is the response from my government (the US) and likewise the Vatican which I stumbled upon during my research.

Let’s start with the Vatican’s: “The right to freedom of thought and expression, sanctioned by the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Man, cannot imply the right to offend the religious sentiment of believers. This principle applies obviously to any religion.”

The problem is, obviously, the contradiction. If there is a universal declaration that there exists a right to freedom of thought and expression then all expression is part of that right. Expression is on the person who makes it, the offense is on the receiver. If the receiver is offended that is their reaction and I cannot guarantee that the reaction will take place. I can anticipate it, I can think it probable, and I can even intend for it to happen; but I can’t guarantee it. The result of such a position stemming from the Vatican’s statement is that I have a right to expression as long as it is not likely that someone will be offended by my expression. This is ignoring the “thought” aspect of it, that even my thoughts must be subject to the likely reaction of another individual. I get what’s being said here: that offense to religious sentiment is wrong because we’re a religion too and we can’t have such anti-religious displays of thoughts lest that scuttle over to our camp. Whatever happened to the Catholic doctrine of turn the other cheek?

On the US side we have the assistant secretary of state reading from a prepared statement: “Anti-Muslim images are as unacceptable as anti-Semitic images, anti-Christian images, or any other religious belief [sic].”

Firstly, the images weren’t anti-Muslim they were, generously, anti-Islamic. The images weren’t targeting Muslims just their beliefs and you can always attack a belief. The specific targeting of people, well that runs afoul of the harm principle in Mill. That aside, and borrowing from Christopher Hitchens, it’s nice to see that the sentiment was accidentally correct.

They are just as unacceptable as in they are not unacceptable at all. If an image ridicules a religious sentiment in such a way that the religious believer becomes uncomfortable or offended maybe they should realize their god is stronger than an image, maybe they should look away, or maybe they should realize that what someone else says about their belief has nothing to do with their belief system. The anger over the Danish Cartoons, Piss Christ, and The Satanic Verses was all about protecting other people’s feelings from seeing something that they don’t like. It just has the added emotional support of religious sentiment in it as well.

This translates to the lack of images as well whenever we see a holiday display that, to some, doesn’t display the correct amount of religious symbolism or the proactive expression policing of people who cry when someone tells them happy holidays instead of the correct arrangement of words. It is not an instance of bodily harm, just offense to feelings which is why both official statements are wrong.

Ladders

December 18, 2017 Leave a comment

As a universal atheist, i.e. one that finds all religions to be false, it’s easy to find yourself agreeing with ideas that you normally hate. For example: I don’t want to see Sharia law in the United States but that doesn’t mean that I agree with the type of people who repeatedly post about it because their point is usually about immigration and hating people who are coming from countries where Sharia law is just the law. It’s useless to indicate that there is no chance of Sharia law in the United States due to that pesky 1st Amendment and 200 years of legal precedent as a protection, but nonetheless I don’t want Sharia Law.

It is however worth pointing out that those same people are often the ones lobbying to remove those protections so that their religion can be the one in charge. Weird, because the two religions have a lot of the same rules, just a couple of differences of trivial importance. I also find it uncomfortable when I find myself agreeing with some of the ridiculing of various religious practices from the same kind of individuals often reverting to the type of comments that begin “well yeah that is pretty silly but so is X.” This is to remind the individual that for every religious rite/rule/habit of the foreign religion their religion has just the same silly feature that they follow without question. Yes, it’s pretty silly that two of the Abrahamic religions won’t eat pig meat, but it’s just as silly to abstain from fish on Friday during a specific forty day period set by the full moon. That’s the real power of religion, to take something arbitrary and make it a rule. Tell a group of people that they can’t eat French fries on a Tuesday and they’ll laugh at you, tell them that rule is in a holy book, and it’ll give them pause. The more liberal of them might actually consider following it for fear of upsetting someone else, while the more conservative might order double to purposefully offend this made up group.

Raised Catholic I never questioned the prohibition of eating meat on a Friday during Lent. The reasoning behind this, which I’m sure I’m actually going to be educating some of the few Catholics I have reading this, is pretty ridiculous. Since Jesus was allegedly executed on a Friday giving up his flesh, the Catholic church decided as a way to honor that, that “flesh” meant meat so the faithful were to abstain. The original rule was every Friday but then that changed to only the Fridays during Lent (at most 5 days) and Ash Wednesday. Now they’re allowed to eat fish though, because according to the Latin origin the word “carnis” which is “meat” translates to “animal flesh” which for some reason doesn’t include fish…because fish aren’t animals (?). Whatever, this is a religion that based on the same book that thinks bats are birds (Lev 11:19) and that rabbits chew their cud (Lev 11:5 and 11:6). Also in that same chapter their are four legged flying creatures. Further to get along with the ridiculousness the Catholic church decreed in the 17th century that the Beaver was a fish for the purposes of Lent, also the Capybara, because since they live in the water they must be fish.

However those are minor things and unless you are completely devoid of a sense of humor, they’re pretty absurd. When we get into the various sects of religions things get more serious. For example I see posts ridiculing ISIS (as is deserved) and the simmering Islamic civil war between the two major off-shoots of Sunni and Shia. The difference is political, Muhammed didn’t leave an heir and the sects developed over the difference between who should lead the Islamic Caliphate back in the 7th century. Dumb, says the evangelical minister, why can’t they just get along like all the Christians do? Never mind the millennia long history of Christian sectarian war (not just violence but straight up war), most recently in what is known as “The Troubles” of Irish history. The Muslims do seem to get along at their most holy of sites though, the violence is done to pilgrims on their way to and from it, but never, it seems, there (minus the occasional trampling which seems to happen every year).

Well it happens with the Christians too. Which brings me to the most absurd example of how religion poisons everything and it involves a ladder. That’s not a metaphor, it’s a literal ladder.

The holiest site in the Christian religion is in one of two places: the alleged birthplace of Jesus or the alleged resurrection site. The latter is the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem and its presided over six different Christian sects: Greek Orthodox, Armenian Apostolic, Roman Catholic, Coptic, Ethiopian, and Syriac Orthodox. These six groups do not like each other, to the point where moving a chair outside a monastery at the church a mere couple inches started a fist fight between the Coptic and Ethiopian monks landing eleven in the hospital (there were a bunch of videos on the internet about it). Because these six groups couldn’t decide who was in charge of what back in ancient times they constantly fought over which group would oversee the alleged* site of the death and resurrection of their God. Because of the violence, the Sultan Osman III of the Ottoman Empire decreed what is known as the “status quo.” Basically, this meant that everything would freeze as is in the 18th century as the Ottoman empire controlled the region. No change to Holy Sites could be made without universal agreement amongst the various religious groups.

This brings us to the ladder. At some point, no one really knows, but definitely in the mid 18th century someone put a ladder on a ledge near a window. That person was probably doing some work there, but it can’t be moved because of the sectarian disagreements. The question is, who owns the ladder and who has the right to move it? The problem is that you can’t six different groups to agree that a ladder should be taken down. There’s probably a lot of spite going on, but c’mon, it’s a ladder. I’ll do it, provided that travel and stay expenses are covered. I won’t, however treat it with reverence because it’s a ladder that has no historical significance other than indicating how petty and silly religious groups can be when it comes to territory. Which is the real lesson here. See we atheists can point to bombings, assassinations and wars to show what evil humans do in the name of superstition, but if we want a real lesson in how absurd this can get, it’s a ladder on a ledge outside of a window that is the real icon of religion.

*I keep using “alleged” because of the story of how this site was chosen seems suspicious to me. Emperor Constantine’s mother chose them, as the story goes, but how she made the choices seems to be a matter of controversy (I’ll bet it was chosen simply to remove the temple to Aphrodite from Jerusalem).

The No True Christian Fallacy

November 6, 2017 Leave a comment

Every semester since I began teaching my skepticism course, I’ve offered the following assignment:

Choose one informal fallacy, explain it, give a relevant example and then discuss.

The entire course is based around conspiracy theories and pseudoscience. There’s no reason that a student shouldn’t be able to come up with a cromulent example. Depending on what school you subscribe to there is either one fallacy or there are over a hundred. The former is a remark made to me by a colleague who said that, really the only informal fallacy is the non-sequitur since the conclusion never follows from the premises. The latter is because you can find one fallacy with many different sub-fallacies underneath it’s umbrella. For example, an argument ad hominem (against the person rather than against the argument) is a large category with several smaller derivations. The “guilt by association” fallacy is really just an ad hominem slightly to the left of the person.

When teaching I don’t wear my atheism on my sleeve. I keep my personal beliefs, aside from being anti-conspiracy theory, out of the course where possible. Though I think my concentration on evidence based reasoning might lend itself to exposing my skepticism of religious belief, but I’ve also received comments from student evaluations wondering why I had to be so religious in class (seriously, I think it’s because I have a wide religious knowledge like most atheists in fact).

I have a student this semester we’ll call “George.” She has chosen for her example, the “No True Scotsman” fallacy and she wants to apply it to right wing Christianity. Her central claim is that people like Pat Robertson and the numerous people like him are not Christians because their rhetoric does not reflect True Christianity. George, whom I did not expect to take this line of thought, believed that when they say that people who are unlike them are guilty of the fallacy. Clearly her and I needed to sit down.

I explained very quickly that she was either “right with a ‘but'” or “wrong with an ‘if.'” (thank you Simpsons); because while she was correct in her estimation of their problem, she was wrong in that she’s committing the exact same fallacy as them. The look on her face forced the question out of me (it didn’t “beg the question” because that’s an entirely different thing), “are you a Christian?”

She said that she was, and a Catholic. Which then prompted her to explain that everyone who didn’t follow a specific set of Christian rules weren’t really Christians and these people she was planning on talking about qualified. I then pointed out that they would say the exact same thing about her, further they would probably call her a heretic and a polytheist because of the Catholic veneration of Saints and Mary. This elicited a laugh from her but my facial expression conveyed that I was being utterly serious.

The way the No True Scotsman works is that you see a member of a group doing something and the claim is that by very action they are performing, disqualifies them from being a member of that group. “No true Christian would ever say God hates fags.” “No true Muslim would ever commit an act of terrorism.” “No true Buddhist would ever condone genocide.”

Via, rationalwiki, Henry Drummond said, “No man can ever be opposed to Christianity, who knows what it really is.”

The problem is in the definition of group itself. Is there a distinct set of qualifications that make one a member and prevent them from joining. “No true bachelor is married,” is not an example of the fallacy because ontologically the definition requires that person to not be married. No true Christian denies the existence of Jesus, is again, not an example because the definition requires the individual to believe that Jesus existed. However, behaviors are not ontological qualifications. The assassin of Dr. Bernart Slepian was a Christian despite his willingness to murder a person in his own home, and despite the fact that the popular belief is that Jesus would not condone such an action. This is despite the fact that the assassin claimed to be a Christian.

What the fallacy amounts to is distancing an individual from a group because we identify ourselves as members of the group and wish to avoid being the target of a guilt by association fallacy. George may not want to be associated with Pat Robertson because of what he says, and Robertson would likely agree since she’s probably too tolerant and doesn’t think god sends Hurricanes against cities who once elected a lesbian. However, we can’t make the assumption that these people are lying. If they say they are Christians, we should assume they are Christians.

Which is why we have that pesky separation clause to begin with, because when we atheists ask “what religion?” we don’t mean the distinction between Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, etc. as being the religion of the United States; well not just that. We also mean what Christianity? While Catholics and mainline Protestants share a lot in common they also share a number of distinct differences. Even within mainline Protestant Christianity there are many differences. Some Protestant churches have no problems with gay marriage and homosexuality; while others distinctly do. So which one are we picking? The unification of these different sects under the term “Christianity” didn’t really occur until the 70s. Before then you’d be hard pressed to get an Anglican, Episcopalian, Catholic, and Mormon to agree that they were all members of the same religion despite the fact that they all believe in this Jesus fellow.

George seemed genuinely confused as my observation as though she hadn’t ever considered it. Which, is likely the case. I explained that I was raised Catholic and was taught that the other Christianities weren’t the correct ones because their beliefs and practices were different. Likely, kids in other religions were taught the same thing about me. However the core membership qualification is what matters in this fallacy whether or not we like the person’s actions. If an atheist commits an act of terror, they are still an atheist, it’s just that they are a terrible person who coincidentally did the act. This especially applies to religiously motivated actions. If a terrorist says, I did this because of this and for this; we can’t say they didn’t.

 

The September 23rd ridiculousness

September 18, 2017 Leave a comment

Did you know that the world was going to end on Friday the 23rd of September? It isn’t, but there enough people that think it will that garnered an article on Fox News “Science” page. My first question is: how many apocalypses have I lived through? Is it five, it feels like five. It’s been at least two in the last three years, and then there was the 2012 bullshit. I definitely remember one having to deal with a red heifer. It’s hard to keep track of all these things. This is only counting the ones that made the news. I’m sure the world is supposed to end every day according to someone.

The prophecy is the usual mess of cherry picking quotes from whatever text fits. In this case it’s Luke 21:25-26 and Revelation 21:1-2. The latter reads: “And a great sign appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of 12 stars. She was pregnant and was crying out in birth pains and the agony of giving birth.”

The break down of this is: John, the author of the Revelation, was clearly in the midst of a fever dream. Setting that aside, the interpretation has to with numerology and astrology. The backbone of every bronze age religion that is still kicking. The passage is cited because on September 23rd, the astrological sign Venus, will contain the sun, moon, as well as the planet Jupiter. Get it? The sun will be in the constellation (though not really because the sun would have to be a lot further away in order to be “in” the constellation) metaphorically “clothing” it. The constellation will be over the moon’s position, so there’s that. Also three planets and nine stars will be above it. Except that literally billions of stars are going to be both above and below the constellation. This interpretation just concentrates on the nine stars so there you go, really that’s all I could get out of the Revelation passages. Our first question is how did we arrive at the date?

Well remember the Eclipse? That was on August 21st, and September 23rd is 33 days from that. Jesus lived on Earth for 33 years, simple addition and boom! Apocalypse. Yes, like the ancient world that thought an eclipse was a portent of doom, we’ve apparently not advanced passed this superstition in the last couple millenia. Also the whole thing also revolves around the mysterious Earth shattering planetoid/planet/meteor Nibiru–which doesn’t exist, but if non-existence were a barrier to belief I wouldn’t need to write this blog.

This leaves us with the aforementioned Luke passages 21:25-26 “There will be signs in the sun, moon and stars. On the earth, nations will be in anguish and perplexity at the roaring and tossing of the sea. People will faint from terror, apprehensive of what is coming on the world, for the heavenly bodies will be shaken. 26: Men’s hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken.'”

How did we arrive here. Again refer back to the Eclipse on the 21st, the Hurricane hit Texas on the 25th and then the flooding on the 26th. Yeah, that’s it. Here we can see the obvious cherry picking because there’s nothing to indicate why it would be Luke and not any of the other three gospel writers…or perhaps any other book in the Bible, in Exodus we just miss the “eye for an eye” speech. Perhaps that’s why it gets tossed out.

This is obvious bullshit, but it shows the arbitrariness of numerology. Just pick one day, something significant, and then find everything that fits the pre-ordained conclusion. What’s more interesting is this article, in which the author tries to explain how “No True Christian” would believe this. The first thing he does is argue that there is no such thing as a Christian Numerologist, and then deftly explains why these bible code prophecies are prima facie false. On the latter part I agree, but on the former: afraid not buddy.

I was raised Catholic, which is one of the more scientifically literate versions of Christianity, and I was taught the numbers thing. I was taught that the numbers 3, 7, 8, 12, 40, and 1,000 were significant which is why the bible uses those numbers so often. Revelations uses 3 a significant number of times. This makes sense given the time it was written and the impact of Pythagorean philosophy on Greek culture. The “thousand” is an interesting concept because, again in ancient Greek, there are no numbers above a thousand. Anything beyond that was considered “innumerable” such as the number of atoms in the universe. This sometimes gets confused with “infinite” and I take umbrage with some of those interpretations (looking at you Aristotle).

Claiming that there are no Christian numerologists is a claim you can only make if you’re falling into the “Scotsman” fallacy and make the terms “Numerologist” and “Christian” mutually exclusive. As I just said in the previous example, and setting my religious education aside–you can’t make this claim. You can minimize the impact of numerology by saying it’s an old superstition, but that leads to a dark road where you have to begin admitting that prophecies based on numbers (the entire book of Revelation) are irrelevant. Though, to be fair, this too can be dismissed reasonably but that leads to the splitting of hairs so that only a certain type of belief is permissible. Which then gets us back into the differences of sects and what it means to be an actual Christian. We probably don’t want that…again.

*I neglected to link the actual prophecy page on purpose. It will become irrelevant in a few days anyway.